Potassium argon dating formula

And it's going to be in years because that's how we figured out this constant.

Ngauruhoe in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, produced andesite flows in 19 and avalanche deposits in 1975.

And so we could make this as over 1.25 times 10 to the ninth. If I have a natural log of b-- we know from our logarithm properties, this is the same thing as the natural log of b to the a power.

So the negative natural log of 1/2 is the same thing as the natural log of 1/2 to the negative 1 power. Anything to the negative power is just its multiplicative inverse. So negative natural log of 1 half is just the natural log of 2 over here. It's essentially the natural log of 2 over the half-life of the substance.

In this video, I want to go through a concrete example.

And it'll get a little bit mathy, usually involving a little bit of algebra or a little bit of exponential decay, but to really show you how you can actually figure out the age of some volcanic rock using this technique, using a little bit of mathematics.

And now, we can get our calculator out and just solve for what this time is. So this is 1 divided by 1 plus 0.01 divided by 0.11. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.Join Britannica's Publishing Partner Program and our community of experts to gain a global audience for your work! This dating method is based upon the decay of radioactive potassium-40 to radioactive argon-40 in minerals and rocks; potassium-40 also decays to calcium-40.On the other hand, the abundance of argon in the Earth is relatively small because of its escape to the atmosphere during processes associated with volcanism.The potassium-argon dating method has been used to measure a wide variety of ages.

Leave a Reply