Match users browsers while validating

=.*[a-z]) # must contains one lowercase characters (? mkyo Ng12* , special symbol “*” is not allow here 4. MKYONG12$ , lower case character is required Unit test with Test NG.

=.*[@#$%]) # must contains one special symbols in the list "@#$%" .

As mentioned above, we can improve on this by making use of the are already implicit so the input has to match the entire expression. If anyone wants to contribute a more thorough expression to test for valid email or url format, feel free to post it using the Feedback option above.. Since it is not possible to recurse when using a regular expression it is also not possible to create a truly accurate regex for doing email address validation.

The value, clicking 'down' with the input blank will result in a very large number. The examples posted in these responses are vastly oversimplified when compared against reality.

For instance, you set a "validation Error" CSS class to the desired HTML element if it fails validation (style it with a red border in the external CSS stylesheet) and simply remove it again when you want to return to the default.

=.*[A-Z]) # must contains one uppercase characters (? Password is valid : [email protected] , true Password is valid : mk YOn12$ , true Password is valid : m [email protected] , false Password is valid : [email protected] , false Password is valid : mkyo Ng12* , false Password is valid : mkyon G$$ , false Password is valid : MKYONG12$ , false PASSED: Valid Password Test([ String;@116471f) =============================================== com.mkyong.regex.

Here is how it appears in Safari (with our CSS formatting to show the (in)valid state): In a similar fashion to the Again, the input box appears as normal: This time the minimum requirement for most browsers is one or more letters followed by a colon. :[\x01-\x08\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x1f\x21-\x5a\x53-\x7f] | \[\x01-\x09\x0b\x0c\x0e-\x7f]) ) \])\z Or you can look here for more solutions.

Again, not very helpful, but it will stop people trying to input their email address or other such nonsense. Careful examination of the RFCs associated with email addresses has been conducted repeatedly and has been proven to require the use of recursion in order properly determine the validity of an email address using the full set of RFC specifications.

Different browsers may mark the input box in some way (Firefox 4 Beta adds a red box-shadow by default), display a warning (Opera) or even prevent the form from being submitted if this field has no value.

So I wonder, if I could restore that css('border') value for all text input fields somehow - when a button is clicked (or maybe on blur or some other event, indicating that the user has switched to another web form? Alex UPDATE My browser is Firefox 3.6.12 / Win XP, but I want all browsers work of course :-) UPDATE 2 The HTML code for the 3 web forms is below and I only have text and links besides that, no further elements at the web page: to remove it and restore the element to its previous state.

This way you can decorate your alements with a lot more "features" like background-color or font-style as well.

Here is how the two inputs are displayed in Safari: and in Opera: They are currently not supported in Firefox 4 Beta. For example it is perfectly valid for an email address to go to the MX handler for a top level domain.

If you want to restrict the input of a text field to numbers without having the up/down arrows associated with the input box, you can always just set the input type to of "\d " (one or more numbers). So something along the line of [email protected] would be perfectly valid! Anyone out there know how to adjust the url validation so that it will accept inputs in the following format: no need to force a user to input or https:// You can find a comparison of some interesting regexes for validating URLs here.

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